Clinical Staff

The Carrell Clinic™ staff consists of physicians, nurses, x-ray technicians, cast technicians and support personnel who have chosen careers in orthopedics.

As a team, we are devoted to providing the best care possible to meet your individual orthopedic needs. If you have questions about any of our services, please do not hesitate to contact our office.

Physician Assistants

Physician Assistants (PAs) are health care professionals licensed to practice medicine with physician supervision. Graduation from an accredited program and passage of the national certification exam are required for state licensure. The common roles and responsibilities of a physician assistant include performing admission histories and physicals, caring for simple fractures, assisting in the operating room, conducting post-surgical and inpatient rounds, suturing lacerations, performing cast changes, performing minor surgical procedures such as debridement and pin removals, and interpreting X-ray findings. All of these actions are performed with the supervision and consultation of the attending physician.

The role of a physician assistant is not of independent practice, but working as a team with other physicians in the clinic. The Physician-PA team can help to increase efficiency and optimize patient care. Frequent consultation and review of patient care, by both the physician and the PA assures that all patients are receiving the best possible care.

What is a Physician Assistant (PA)?

Physician assistants are health care professionals licensed to practice medicine with physician supervision. As part of their comprehensive responsibilities, PAs conduct physical exams, diagnose and treat illnesses, order and interpret tests, counsel on preventive health care, assist in surgery, and write prescriptions. Within the physician/PA relationship, physician assistants exercise autonomy in medical decision making and provide a broad range of diagnostic and therapeutic services.

How much education does a PA have?

 

Primary School: 12 years
College: 4 years
PA Program (Master’s Degree): 2.5 years
Total: 18.5 years

 

A Family Nurse Practitioner

A Family Nurse Practitioner, who may also be referred to by the acronym FNP, is a registered nurse with specialized educational and clinical training in family practice. Nurse practitioners have a higher degree of training, in both the classroom and clinical setting, than Registered Nurses do, although becoming an RN is a prerequisite. Family Nurse Practitioners in particular are trained to work with both children and adults, most often in the context of a family practice or clinical setting. FNPs work with patients on maintaining health and wellness over the long term with a particular focus on preventative care. Many FNPs also choose to work in underserved populations and communities.

An FNP may work under the direct supervision of a physician. More and more states, however, are allowing FNPs to work independently due to an extreme lack of doctors, particularly in the area of family practice.

The Registered Nurse First Assistant (RNFA) is a registered nurse who has received advanced training as a certified perioperative nurse (CNOR) and surgical first assistant, or as an advanced registered nurse practitioner with specialized surgical and first assistant training.

To complete an RNFA program, the RN must have, at least, two years of professional nursing experience in the operating room environment, achieve the credential of CNOR (Certified Perioperative Nurse), or possess an advanced registered nurse practice degree and complete the training in surgical first assistant.

Certified Physician Assistants

Orthopedic Physician Assistants

Family Nurse Practitioners

Registered Nurses